Hugh McDonald

Hugh McDonald

Hugh McDonald was born in 1913. He attended the FBI National Academy and eventually became second in command at the Military Intelligence School at Fort McArthur.

In 1949 McDonald joined the Los Angeles Police Department. He held several posts and by 1963 was Division Chief, Los Angeles County Sheriff's Department. According to McDonald, he was "frequently granted leave to be of service to several government agencies". It was while he was on one of these jobs, Head of Security for Barry Goldwater, that he employed former ex-CIA agent, Herman Kimsey.

Soon afterwards, Kimsey told McDonald the story about Saul (Georgi Visko). Kimsey claimed that John F. Kennedy was killed on the orders of Nikita Khrushchev. The operation was planned by the KGB. Saul and Lee Harvey Oswald were both recruited to fire at Kennedy. Oswald was told to miss on purpose whereas Saul's job was to kill Kennedy. McDonald claims he interviewed Saul who backed-up this story. His book about the assassination, Appointment in Dallas, was published in 1975.

After the publication of the book, McDonald was contacted by Anatoli Cherenkov of the KGB. Cherenkov claims that Mikhail Tsymbal (KGB chief in Paris) had a meeting with Lyndon B. Johnson in Helsinki, Finland, in the summer of 1963. At this meeting LBJ was told that John F. Kennedy and his brother, Robert Kennedy, intended to have him prosecuted over the Bobby Baker affair. In order to save himself from being sent to prison, LBJ is told he will have to cover-up the assassination of Kennedy. According to Cherenkov, Johnson agreed to these demands. An account of this meeting appeared in LBJ and the JFK Conspiracy (1978).

Other books by McDonald include Black Sea Caper, The Blue Fox, Letter from Kiev, The Investigation of Sex Crimes, The Classification of Police Photographs and The Psychology of Police Interrogation.

Hugh McDonald died of a heart attack in about 1985.

Johnson rose again and walked over to the window in back of the Soviet agent. On this bright, sunny day the conversation seemed unreal to him. Staring out of the window he tried to keep his composure intact. The solid look of the buildings helped. They were real. The azure blue color of the sea surrounding Helsinki reminded him of the Texas gulf in the spring. They were on the second floor. He could see people below, walking rap¬idly, hurrying about their business. He envied them. He, the Vice President of the United States, would have changed placed with the poorest of them. Instinctively, Lyndon Johnson knew the purpose of the meeting. He hunched his huge shoulders, turned around and walked back to his chair. "You're right. Bob Kennedy would get me if I gave him a chance. They both hate me. Give them the information you have, and they will destroy me."

"Much more than destroy you politically, Mr. Johnson. You know, of course, of Mr. Kennedy's investigation into the affairs of a Robert Baker?"

"I know. He'll never make it there."

"You are wrong. He is going to succeed in opening up that affair. We know this, Mr. Johnson, because we're part of the process. When that happens, you not only will be destroyed politically, you will go to prison, which is exactly what Robert Kennedy and the President,, want. There is no escape, sir, if John Kennedy remains President of your country."

Johnson leaned forward, no longer nervous but hard, tough, a fighter. "What do you propose?"

Tsymbal poured tea then pinned the Vice President with his dark eyes. "I propose, sir, to assassinate President dent John F. Kennedy, thereby making you the President. That fact will solve your problems and many of ours."

Johnson never blinked an eye. "Where do I fit in?" The question represented complete surrender to the Russian.

"Your part is simple. The action is planned in every detail. You will not want to know those plans. We understand that the President will be in Dallas, Texas. You must give us the details of that trip. After the assassination we will expect you to arrange an investigation that keeps our government in the clear. For these small things, Mr. Johnson, we offer you the Presidency of the United States and your reputation."

Johnson's voice lowered in resignation. "Who gets that information?" "A Mr. Albert Osborne," the Russian answered triumphantly. "He will be at the Hilton Hotel in Dallas. Send it in a plain envelope so if it falls into the wrong hands, no one can trace it. On the upper left corner of the envelope write the name `Mason,' just that single word. After the action, call us on a secure line at the first possible moment, and we will have a plan for the coverup investigation. At that time, my friend, you will be the President of the United States."

Johnson nodded and stood up. "Mr. Tsymbal, it has been an important and useful meeting."

The Russian walked him to the door and held it open, speaking so that those in the outer office could hear. "Thank you for coming, Mr. Vice President. Please tell President Kennedy that Premier Khrushchev sends his best wishes."


McDonald History, Family Crest & Coats of Arms

The old Scottish-Dalriadan name McDonald is derived from the Anglicized version of the Gaelic personal name Mac Dhomhnuill. McDonald is a patronymic surname, which belongs to the category of hereditary surnames. The surname McDonald arose from the vernacular naming tradition, whereby surnames were formed by adopting the given name of one's father, or another ancestor. This name was first found in Kintyre, where members of this family had resided for many years.

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Early Origins of the McDonald family

The surname McDonald was first found in Kintyre, and much of the Eastern islands and coast-lands where members of this Clan, descended through Somerled, Lord of the Isles and had resided for many years.

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Early History of the McDonald family

This web page shows only a small excerpt of our McDonald research. Another 300 words (21 lines of text) covering the years 1336, 1386, 1423, 1437, 1449, 1603, and 1692 are included under the topic Early McDonald History in all our PDF Extended History products and printed products wherever possible.

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McDonald Spelling Variations

Translation in medieval times was an undeveloped science and was often carried out without due care. For this reason, many early Scottish names appeared radically altered when written in English. The spelling variations of McDonald include MacDonald, Macdonald, McDonald, Donaldson, MacDonny and many more.

Early Notables of the McDonald family (pre 1700)

Notable amongst the Clan from early times was John of Islay, or John MacDonald, (d. 1386), who was the Lord of the Isles (1336-86) and chief of Clan.
Another 28 words (2 lines of text) are included under the topic Early McDonald Notables in all our PDF Extended History products and printed products wherever possible.

Migration of the McDonald family to Ireland

Some of the McDonald family moved to Ireland, but this topic is not covered in this excerpt.
Another 66 words (5 lines of text) about their life in Ireland is included in all our PDF Extended History products and printed products wherever possible.

McDonald migration +

Some of the first settlers of this family name were:

McDonald Settlers in United States in the 17th Century
McDonald Settlers in United States in the 18th Century
  • Caul McDonald, who arrived in South Carolina in 1716 [1]
  • Rose McDonald, who arrived in South Carolina in 1716 [1]
  • Randal McDonald, who arrived in New England in 1718 [1]
  • Mary McDonald, who landed in New York in 1738 [1]
  • Anna McDonald, who landed in Philadelphia, Pennsylvania in 1738 [1]
  • . (More are available in all our PDF Extended History products and printed products wherever possible.)
McDonald Settlers in United States in the 19th Century
  • Allen McDonald, who arrived in Allegany (Allegheny) County, Pennsylvania in 1802 [1]
  • Daniel McDonald, who arrived in Allegany (Allegheny) County, Pennsylvania in 1806 [1]
  • Thomas McDonald, who arrived in America in 1806 [1]
  • Archibald McDonald, who arrived in America in 1809 [1]
  • Lauchlin McDonald, aged 27, who arrived in North Carolina in 1812 [1]
  • . (More are available in all our PDF Extended History products and printed products wherever possible.)
McDonald Settlers in United States in the 20th Century
  • James Edward McDonald, who arrived in Mississippi in 1900 [1]
  • Robert Walter McDonald, who arrived in Mississippi in 1900 [1]
  • W A McDonald, who arrived in Mississippi in 1900 [1]
  • Hans Peter McDonald, who arrived in Wisconsin in 1907 [1]
  • Samuel McDonald, who landed in Alabama in 1921 [1]

McDonald migration to Canada +

Some of the first settlers of this family name were:

McDonald Settlers in Canada in the 18th Century
  • Peter McDonald, who landed in Nova Scotia in 1750
  • Mary McDonald, who landed in Pictou, Nova Scotia in 1773
  • Mary McDonald, who arrived in Nova Scotia in 1773
  • John McDonald, who arrived in Pictou, Nova Scotia in 1773
  • John McDonald, who landed in Nova Scotia in 1773
  • . (More are available in all our PDF Extended History products and printed products wherever possible.)
McDonald Settlers in Canada in the 19th Century
  • William McDonald, who arrived in Nova Scotia in 1801
  • James McDonald, who arrived in Nova Scotia in 1801
  • Hugh McDonald, aged 3, who landed in Nova Scotia in 1801
  • Isobel McDonald, who arrived in Nova Scotia in 1801
  • Janet McDonald, aged 3, who arrived in Nova Scotia in 1801
  • . (More are available in all our PDF Extended History products and printed products wherever possible.)

McDonald migration to Australia +

Emigration to Australia followed the First Fleets of convicts, tradespeople and early settlers. Early immigrants include:

McDonald Settlers in Australia in the 18th Century
  • Miss Flora Mcdonald, (b. 1742), aged 51, Irish convict who was convicted in Antrim, Ireland for 7 years for stealing, transported aboard the "Boddingtons" on 15th February 1793, arriving in New South Wales, Australia, he died in 1800 [2]
McDonald Settlers in Australia in the 19th Century
  • Mr. Michael McDonald, Irish convict who was convicted in Dublin, Ireland for 7 years, transported aboard the "Atlas" on 29th November 1801, arriving in New South Wales, Australia[3]
  • Francis McDonald, English convict from Devon, who was transported aboard the "Ann" on August 1809, settling in New South Wales, Australia[4]
  • Mr. Charles McDonald, English convict who was convicted in Surrey, England for 7 years, transported aboard the "Atlas" on 16th January 1816, arriving in New South Wales, Australia[3]
  • Alexander McDonald, Scottish convict from Edinburgh, who was transported aboard the "Asia" on September 3rd, 1820, settling in New South Wales, Australia[5]
  • John McDonald, Scottish convict from Glasgow, who was transported aboard the "Asia" on September 3rd, 1820, settling in New South Wales, Australia[5]
  • . (More are available in all our PDF Extended History products and printed products wherever possible.)

McDonald migration to New Zealand +

Emigration to New Zealand followed in the footsteps of the European explorers, such as Captain Cook (1769-70): first came sealers, whalers, missionaries, and traders. By 1838, the British New Zealand Company had begun buying land from the Maori tribes, and selling it to settlers, and, after the Treaty of Waitangi in 1840, many British families set out on the arduous six month journey from Britain to Aotearoa to start a new life. Early immigrants include:

McDonald Settlers in New Zealand in the 19th Century
  • Adam Cummings McDONALD, who landed in Wellington, New Zealand in 1840
  • D McDONALD, who landed in Wellington, New Zealand in 1840 aboard the ship Blenheim
  • Peter McDONALD, who landed in Wellington, New Zealand in 1840
  • W H McDONALD, who landed in Wellington, New Zealand in 1840 aboard the ship Glenbevie
  • William McDONALD, who landed in Auckland, New Zealand in 1840
  • . (More are available in all our PDF Extended History products and printed products wherever possible.)

Contemporary Notables of the name McDonald (post 1700) +

  • Arthur Bruce "Art" McDonald OC OOnt FRSFRSC (b. 1943), Canadian astrophysicist, Director of Sudbury Neutrino Observatory Institute, Fellow of the Royal Society (FRS) of London, co-recipient of the 2015 Nobel Prize in Physics
  • Alexander McDonald (1937-2016), Scottish minister of the Church of Scotland, Moderator of the General Assembly of the Church of Scotland from 1997 to 1998
  • Drew McDonald (1955-2015), born Charles Shaw, a Scottish professional wrestler
  • Allan J. McDonald (d. 2021), American engineer, aerospace consultant, author and the director of the Space Shuttle Solid Rocket Motor Project for Morton-Thiokol, a NASA subcontractor
  • Colin Campbell McDonald AM (1928-2021), Australian cricketer who played in 47 Test matches from 1952 to 1961, and 192 first-class matches between 1947 and 1963
  • Stuart Richard McDonald (1928-2017), Australian politician, Member of the Victorian Legislative Council for Northern Province (1967�)
  • Roy McDonald (1937-2018), Canadian poet, busker, author and lay philosopher from London, Ontario
  • General Charles Clarence McDonald (1933-2017), United States Air Force general, Commander of the Air Force Logistics Command (COMAFLC) from 1989 to 1992
  • Les McDonald CM (1933-2017), British-born, Canadian founding President of the International Triathlon Union
  • Lorna Lorraine McDonald (1916-2017), née Bucknall, an Australian historian and author
  • . (Another 305 notables are available in all our PDF Extended History products and printed products wherever possible.)

Historic Events for the McDonald family +

Air New Zealand Flight 901
  • Miss Shirley Jane Mcdonald (1944-1979), New Zealander passenger, from Palmerston North, North Island, New Zealand aboard the Air New Zealand Flight 901 for an Antarctic sightseeing flight when it flew into Mount Erebus she died in the crash [6]
Empress of Ireland
  • Mr. Charles Keven McDonald, British Junior 4th Engineer from United Kingdom who worked aboard the Empress of Ireland and died in the sinking [7]
  • Mr. Alexander Betteley McDonald, British Purser from United Kingdom who worked aboard the Empress of Ireland and died in the sinking [7]
  • Mr. Louis Adam McDonald, British Steward from United Kingdom who worked aboard the Empress of Ireland and survived the sinking [7]
Halifax Explosion
  • Mrs. Catherine  McDonald, Canadian resident from Poor Farm Cole Harbour, Nova Scotia, Canada who died in the explosion [8]
  • Mrs. Mary  McDonald (1850-1917), Canadian resident from Halifax, Nova Scotia, Canada who died in the explosion [8]
  • Mrs. Mary  McDonald (1856-1917), Canadian resident from Halifax, Nova Scotia, Canada who died in the explosion [8]
  • Mrs. Margaret  McDonald, Canadian resident from Halifax, Nova Scotia, Canada who died in the explosion [8]
  • Mr. John  McDonald (1874-1917), Canadian resident from Halifax, Nova Scotia, Canada who died in the explosion [8]
  • . (Another 8 entries are available in all our PDF Extended History products and printed products wherever possible.)
HMAS Sydney II
  • Mr. John Dennis McDonald (1918-1941), Australian Able Seaman from Waterloo, New South Wales, Australia, who sailed into battle aboard HMAS Sydney II and died in the sinking [9]
HMS Hood
  • Mr. Wallace McDonald (b. 1913), English Able Seaman serving for the Royal Navy from Doncaster, Yorkshire, England, who sailed into battle and died in the sinking [10]
  • Mr. Harold McDonald (b. 1910), English Able Seaman serving for the Royal Navy from Portsmouth, Hampshire, England, who sailed into battle and died in the sinking [10]
  • Mr. Ewen McDonald (b. 1920), Scottish Able Seaman serving for the Royal Navy from Mallaig, Inverness, Scotland, who sailed into battle and died in the sinking [10]
HMS Prince of Wales
  • Mr. Donald Mcdonald, British Electrical Artificer, who sailed into battle on the HMS Prince of Wales and survived the sinking [11]
HMS Repulse
  • Mr. James McDonald, British Ordinary Seaman, who sailed into battle on the HMS Repulse and survived the sinking [12]
HMS Royal Oak
  • Albert McDonald (1923-1939), British Boy 1st Class with the Royal Navy aboard the HMS Royal Oak when she was torpedoed by U-47 and sunk he died in the sinking [13]
Lady of the Lake
  • Mr. Charles McDonald (b. 1811), Irish labourer from Coleraine, Northern Ireland who sailed aboard the "Lady of the Lake" from Greenock, Scotland on 8th April 1833 to Quebec, Canada when the ship hit ice and sunk of the coast of Newfoundland on the 11th May 1833 and he died in the sinking
RMS Lusitania
  • Mr. John Mcdonald, English Fireman from England, who worked aboard the RMS Lusitania and died in the sinking [14]
  • Mr. Charles Mcdonald, English First Waiter from England, who worked aboard the RMS Lusitania and survived the sinking [14]
  • Mr. James Mcdonald, English Trimmer from Liverpool, England, who worked aboard the RMS Lusitania and died in the sinking [14]
USS Arizona
  • Mr. Don E. McDonald, American Seaman First Class working aboard the ship "USS Arizona" when she sunk during the Japanese attack on Pearl Harbor on 7th December 1941, he survived the sinking [15]

Related Stories +

The McDonald Motto +

The motto was originally a war cry or slogan. Mottoes first began to be shown with arms in the 14th and 15th centuries, but were not in general use until the 17th century. Thus the oldest coats of arms generally do not include a motto. Mottoes seldom form part of the grant of arms: Under most heraldic authorities, a motto is an optional component of the coat of arms, and can be added to or changed at will many families have chosen not to display a motto.

Motto: Per mare per terras
Motto Translation: By sea and by land.


Hugh McDonald - History

Picture Courtesy of Charles Germany. We are saddened to report that Mr. Germany died on July 2, 2004.

As described on his tombstone, Daniel McDonald Sr. was born 1780, a native of Moore Co, NC. He married Flora Douglas, daughter of Daniel & Effie Douglas, 1802 in Richmond Co, NC. The young family lived directly across the state line in Chesterfield District, SC. There was a sojourn in the latter 1830's in Tuscaloosa Co, AL, before the final move to Neshoba Co, MS. Daniel, his wife and several of his children are buried at Old Carolina Presbyterian Church Cemetery in Neshoba Co, MS.

Daniel McDonald Records & Information

Perry Co, AL, 11 April 1837. Daniel McDonald of State of Alabama, County of Tuscaloosa, to Jacob Johnson, 160 acres of land. Print Deed

Nancy W. Winden of Houston, TX found the following article in a publication. The information matches information circulated in the family and accumulated through census and original records:
"My ancestor, Daniel McDonald, was born in the year 1780 in Moore County, North Carolina, and an older brother, John McDonald, was born in the year 1773 in Argyllshire, Scotland. The tradition is that their father was John McDonald. Daniel married Flora Douglass in 1802 and they had at least five children born in South Carolina (some and maybe all at Chesterfield.) His brother John married Margaret McDougal in 1802 and had at least eight children born in North Carolina (some and maybe all in Robeson County.) Daniel and some of his family moved from South Carolina to the southern part of Tuscaloosa County, Alabama on the Black Warrior River. This move was made during the period of up to 10 years before 1831. It is not known exactly how long they were there. Two daughters were married there in the early 1830's. By 1836 some of the family had moved to the western part of Neshoba County, Mississippi. By 1850 or before they were all in Neshoba County. By 1840 the brother John and his wife Margaret and most of their children had moved to this same county and lived all within a few miles of each other including his brother Daniel and family. Other relatives from North and South Carolina moved to Neshoba County. Both Daniel and John and many members of their families are buried at a graveyard called Carolina. The land for this graveyard and for the Carolina Presbyterian Church was given by Daniel's brother John McDonald from part of his homestead."

"On March 3, 1966, a tornado came through the Carolina area and destroyed the old original church building. Fragments of this old building were spread and broke many of the old gravestones. The broken stones were replaced with "Flat Head Stones" and that is what is on Daniel McDonald's grave. I found the old original but broken stone in a pile of other broken stones and made this picture." (Charles Germany letter January 2001)

Hugh McDonald Records & Information

Tuscaloosa Co, AL Orphans Court Records 1854-1858
April 27, 1857, p. 488. James Lewis deceased with will annexed. James C. Spencer, admr to pay to Catherine Lewis, the widow $548.90, to children of decd 12 in number each $182.96. Children: Charles A., James Jr, Andrew J., George W., Wiley, Thomas, Mary Wetherford, Manerva Lyon, Sarah Williams, Martha (Mrs. Edmond) Parker, Margaret McCarty, Louisa Lewis. Administrator has paid Wesley, Thomas & Lousa Lewis each the sum of $182.96 as per receipts of Hugh McDonald, their guardian.

Neshoba Democrat, July 16, 1896. Notice. W. L. Bassett, Sheriff and administrator of the Estate of Hugh McDonald, Deceased. vs W. F. Hollis. Sale of land to cover May 1893 indebtedness of $524.72.

Neshoba Democrat, July 16, 1896. W. L. Bassett, Sheriff and administrator of the Estate of Hugh McDonald, Deceased vs G. A. Maloy. Sale of property to satisfy debt of $334.60.

Descendants of John McDonald

1. John 1 McDonald was born Abt. 1719 in Scotland, and died Abt. 1803, probably in North Carolina.

Children of John McDonald and his Unknown wife are:

+ 2 i. John 2 McDonald, born February 1773 in Argyleshire, Scotland died March 14, 1865 in Neshoba County, MS.

+ 3 ii. Daniel McDonald, Sr., born June 29, 1780 in Moore Co, NC died September 20, 1862 in Neshoba County, MS.

+ 4 iii. Murdock McDonald, born Bet. 1786 - 1790 in Moore Co, Fayette District, NC died about 1828 in Black Warrior River, AL.

+ 5 iv. Christina McDonald, born 1791 in Moore Co, NC died September 21, 1871 in Neshoba County, MS.

+ 6 v. James McDonald, born Abt. 1795 in Chesterfield District, SC died May 01, 1860 in Kemper Co, MS.

2. John 2 McDonald (John 1 ) was born February 1773 in Argyleshire, Scotland, and died March 14, 1865 in Neshoba County, MS. He married Margaret McDougal August 22, 1802, daughter of Arch McDougald and Mary Ann. She was born August 20, 1780 in Robeson Co, NC, and died December 09, 1857 in Neshoba Co, MS. Both are buried at Old Carolina Presbyterian Church Cemetery, Neshoba Co, MS.

1850 Neshoba Co, MS Census #441-461
1860 Neshoba Co, MS Census, Laurel Hill PO, Township 10 Range 10 #861-890

Children of John McDonald and Margaret McDougal are:

7 i. John 3 McDonald.

8 ii. Mary McDonald. She married Unknown Wilkinson.

+ 9 iii. Daniel N C McDonald, born Abt. 1816 in North Carolina died in Reilly Springs, TX.

+ 10 iv. Neill McDonald, born September 18, 1803 in North Carolina died June 22, 1852 in Neshoba County, MS.

11 v. Jane McDonald, born July 28, 1805 died October 08, 1855. She married Unknown Parker.

+ 12 vi. Hugh McDonald, born Bet. 1811 - 1812 in North Carolina.

13 vii. James McDonald, born February 24, 1818 died September 04, 1852 in Neshoba Co, MS.

+ 14 viii. Margaret McDonald, born September 15, 1820 died June 07, 1855 in Neshoba Co, MS.

3. Daniel 2 McDonald, Sr. (John 1 ) was born June 29, 1780 in Moore Co, NC, and died September 20, 1862 in Neshoba County, MS. He married Flora Douglas 1802 in Richmond Co, NC, daughter of Daniel Douglass and Effie McLean. She was born January 10, 1781 in Richmond Co, NC, and died September 03, 1850 in Neshoba County, MS.

1840 Neshoba Co, MS Census
1841 Neshoba Co, MS State Census
1845 Neshoba Co, MS State Census
1850 - Enumerated in the Neshoba Co, MS household of son-in-law Neill McMillan
1860 - Enumerated in the Neshoba Co, MS household of son-in-law Neill McMillan

Children of Daniel McDonald and Flora Douglas are:

+ 15 i. Rev. Daniel 3 McDonald, born March 20, 1805 in Chesterfield District, SC died December 05, 1884 in Leake County, MS.

+ 16 ii. Mary Ann McDonald, born March 03, 1810 in Chesterfield District, SC died February 14, 1869 in Neshoba Co, MS.

+ 17 iii. Hugh McDonald, born February 13, 1813 in Chesterfield Co, SC died June 12, 1894 in Laurel Hill, Neshoba County, MS.

+ 18 iv. Catherine McDonald, born March 18, 1816 in Chesterfield Co, SC died January 04, 1886 in Neshoba Co, MS.

+ 19 v. James McDonald, born Bet. 1819 - 1820 in Chesterfield Co, SC died Abt. 1900 in Leake County, MS.

4. Murdock 2 McDonald (John 1 ) was born Bet. 1786 - 1790 in Moore Co, Fayette District, NC, and died Abt. 1828 in Black Warrior River, AL. He married Effie Douglas Abt. 1814 in North Carolina, daughter of Daniel Douglass and Effie McLean. She was born Bet. 1796 - 1797 in North Carolina, and died Abt. 1866 in Mississippi.

Children of Murdock McDonald and Effie Douglas are:

+ 20 i. Catherine 3 McDonald, born June 14, 1815 in South Carolina.

21 ii. Daniel McDonald, born April 26, 1819 in South Carolina died July 04, 1903 in Midlothian, Lincoln Co, OK. He married Margaret Cumpsty 1847 in South Carolina.

22 iii. Christianna McDonald, born April 09, 1821 in Chesterfield, SC died August 20, 1898. She married Joseph Smith November 1839 in South Carolina.

+ 23 iv. Murdock James McDonald, Rev., born December 1822 in Chesterfield District, SC died 1906 in Neshoba Co, MS.

5. Christina 2 McDonald (John 1 ) was born 1791 in Moore Co, NC, and died September 21, 1871 in Neshoba County, MS. She married Alexander Houston McNair. He was born 1797 in Scotland, and died 1836 in South Carolina.

Enumerated at age 80 in the Neshoba Co, MS household of James M. McNair.

Children of Christina McDonald and Alexander McNair are:

24 i. Malcolm D. 3 McNair, born 1819 in North Carolina died 1907 in Neshoba Co, MS. He married (1) Elizabeth McDonald born December 09, 1836 in Robeson Co, NC. He married (2) Sarah Ellen McNair born July 10, 1850 died March 15, 1932.

Company C, MS Cavalry, Private, CSA

25 ii. Margaret Ann McNair, born December 03, 1822 in Chesterfield District, SC died January 01, 1857 in Neshoba Co, MS.

+ 26 iii. James Monroe McNair, born 1826 in South Carolina died February 04, 1913.

27 iv. Hugh D. McNair, born 1829 in South Carolina died 1863 at the Siege of Vicksburg in the War Between the States. He married Jane B. Abt. 1849 in Neshoba Co, MS born 1827 in Scotland.

Company G, Miss. Infantry Private, CSA

28 v. Thomas McNair, born in South Carolina.

29 vi. John F. McNair, born in South Carolina.

6. James 2 McDonald (John 1 ) was born Abt. 1795 in Chesterfield District, SC, and died May 01, 1860 in Kemper Co, MS. He married Flora Campbell, daughter of John Campbell and Catherine McDougal. She was born September 26, 1807 in North Carolina, and died January 04, 1883 in Kemper Co, MS. They are buried in McDonald Cemetery, Kemper Co, MS.

Children of James McDonald and Flora Campbell are:

30 i. Kate 3 McDonald, born Abt. 1832 in North Carolina.

+ 31 ii. Lovidey Jane McDonald, born September 01, 1836 in South Carolina died October 07, 1875.

32 iii. Enn McDonald, born Abt. 1845 in Mississippi.

9. Daniel N C 3 McDonald (John 2 , John 1 ) was born Abt. 1816 in North Carolina, and died in Reilly Springs, TX. He married Mary Ann McKay. She was born Abt. 1820 in North Carolina, and died in Reilly Springs, TX.

1850 Neshoba Co, MS Census, #393-412
1860 Neshoba Co, MS Census, Laurel HIll PO, Township 10 Range 10 #862-891

Children of Daniel N. C. McDonald and Mary Ann McKay are:

33 i. Elizabeth A. 4 McDonald, born Abt. 1848 in Mississippi.

34 ii. Sarah Jane McDonald, born July 08, 1850 in Neshoba Co, MS died October 19, 1852 in Neshoba Co, MS.

35 iii. James Alexander McDonald, born Abt. 1853 in Mississippi.

36 iv. John Archie McDonald, born Abt. 1855 in Mississippi.

37 v. Neal Luther McDonald, born Abt. 1858 in Mississippi.

38 vi. William Webster McDonald, born 1860 in Mississippi. He married Lula Jane Caldwell.

10. Neill 3 McDonald (John 2 , John 1 ) was born September 18, 1803 in North Carolina, and died June 22, 1852 in Neshoba County, MS. He married Mary McNair, daughter of Rhoderick McNair and Mary McGill. She was born December 31, 1803 in North Carolina, and died January 16, 1878 in Reilly Springs, Hopkins Co, TX.

1850 Neshoba Co, MS Census #392-411
1860 Neshoba Co, MS Census, Edinburg PO, Township 11 Range 10 #930-960

Children of Neill McDonald and Mary McNair are:

39 i. Jane Smiley 4 McDonald, born Abt. 1831 died May 22, 1869 in Hopkins Co, TX. She married Thomas Joseph Thadius Stribling.

40 ii. Margaret McDonald, born Abt. 1834 in North Carolina.

41 iii. Mary Eliza McDonald, born November 15, 1835 in North Carolina died in Riley Springs, TX. She married Wesley Lewis born February 18, 1835 in Leake Co, MS died May 21, 1901 in Neshoba County, MS/Carolina Cemetary.

42 iv. John R. McDonald, born Bet. 1838 - 1839 in North Carolina.

43 v. Evander McDonald, born Bet. 1839 - 1840 in Mississippi.

44 vi. Caroline McDonald, born Bet. 1842 - 1843 in Mississippi.

45 vii. Neill Archibald McDonald, born Bet. 1845 - 1846 in Mississippi.

46 viii. William Paisley McDonald, born Bet. 1847 - 1848 in Mississippi.

12. Hugh 3 McDonald (John 2 , John 1 ) was born Bet. 1811 - 1812 in North Carolina. He married Flora J.. She was born Abt. 1835 in North Carolina.

1860 Neshoba Co, MS Census, Laurel Hill PO Township 10 Range 10, #864-893
1870 Neshoba Co, MS Census, Beat 4, #965-965
1880 Neshoba Co, MS Census, Beat 4, p. 10, Supv Dist 2, ED 59, #92-94

Children of Hugh McDonald and Flora J. are:

47 i. Margaret 4 McDonald, born Abt. 1858.

48 ii. Daniel C. McDonald, born Abt. 1860.

49 iii. Mary J. McDonald, born Bet. 1863 - 1864.

50 iv. John N. McDonald, born Bet. 1865 - 1867.

51 v. Nancy C. McDonald, born Abt. 1870.

14. Margaret 3 McDonald (John 2 , John 1 ) was born September 15, 1820, and died June 07, 1855 in Neshoba Co, MS. She married William A. McKay. He was born October 28, 1815, and died August 11, 1867 in Neshoba Co, MS. She is buried in Old Carolina Cemetery, Neshoba Co, MS.

Children of Margaret McDonald and William McKay are:

52 i. Elizabeth 4 McKay.

53 ii. James A. McKay, born December 16, 1843 died March 15, 1855 in Neshoba Co, MS.

15. Rev. Daniel 3 McDonald (Daniel 2 , John 1 ) was born March 20, 1805 in Chesterfield District, SC, and died December 05, 1884 in Leake County, MS. He married Elizabeth Caroline Melinda McKee March 09, 1837 in Mississippi, daughter of Unknown McKee and Margaret. She was born May 06, 1818 in South Carolina, and died August 06, 1898 in Neshoba County, MS.

1850 Leake Co, MS Census, 460-516
1870 Neshoba Co, MS Census, Beat 4, #884-884

Children of Rev. Daniel McDonald and Elizabeth McKee are:

54 i. Margaret 4 McDonald, born August 15, 1838 in Mississippi died June 27, 1902. She married Alexander Nicholas McMillan 1868 in Mississippi. He was born September 16, 1839 in Neshoba Co, MS died May 15, 1910. Both are buried in New Harmony Baptist Church, Neshoba Co, MS.

1900 Neshoba Co, MS Census, Beat 4, West Philadelphia, Supv District 5, ED 45, Sheet 8,#136-140

55 ii. Flora McDonald, born Abt. 1839.

56 iii. Mary P. McDonald, born Abt. 1841.

57 iv. John H. McDonald, born Abt. 1844.

58 v. Catherine McDonald, born Abt. 1846.

59 vi. Elizabeth A. McDonald, born Abt. 1849.

60 vii. Martha C. McDonald, born Abt. 1854.

61 viii. Lovenia McDonald, born Abt. 1856.

16. Mary Ann 3 McDonald (Daniel 2 , John 1 ) was born March 03, 1810 in Chesterfield District, SC, and died February 14, 1869 in Neshoba Co, MS. She married Neill McMillan May 19, 1831 in Marion, Perry Co, AL. He was born 1788 in North Carolina, and died May 05, 1873 in Neshoba Co, MS.

1830 Greene Co, AL Land Grant
1840 Neshoba Co, MS Census
1850 Neshoba Co, MS Census #437-457
1860 Neshoba Co, MS Census, Laurel Hill PO Township 10 Range 10, #857-884

Children of Mary Ann McDonald and Neill McMillan are:

62 i. John M. 4 McMillan, born May 26, 1832 in Tuscaloosa Co, AL died August 30, 1913 in Neshoba or Leake Co, MS. He married Catherine L. McDonald 1856 in Mississippi born November 19, 1839 in Neshoba Co, MS died February 07, 1902 in Neshoba or Leake Co, MS.

1860 Neshoba Co, MS Census Laurel Hill PO, Township 10, Range 10 #847-874
1870 Neshoba Co, MS Census, Beat 4, # 914-914
1880 Leake Co, MS Census, Beat 5, p. 454a, #421-477, Farmer
1891 Democratic Executive Committee, Leake Co, MS, Beat 5
1900 Leake Co, MS Census, Beat 5, p. 350A, Supv Dist 5, ED 38, Sheet 16b, #267-285
1912 Confederate Pension Application, Leake Co, MS, 5th Mississippi Infantry

Co. A 33rd Mississippi Regiment "Cumberland Guards", CSA
Co. K 5th Mississippi Regiment under Capt. Z. Booth, CSA

63 ii. James A. McMillan, born June 1834 in Alabama died Bet. 1916 - 1924 in Prob. Leake Co, MS. He married Mary Hannah Peebles 1875 in Neshoba Co, MS born March 16, 1857 in Mississippi died January 05, 1946 in Prob. Leake Co, MS.

1870 Neshoba Co, MS Census Beat 4, #946-946
1880 Neshoba Co, MS Census, Beat 4, p. 9 Supv Dist. 2, ED 69, #86-87
1900 Leake Co, MS Census, Beat 5, p. 346, Supv Dist 5, ED 38, Sheet 12A, #193-205
1900 Confederate Pension Application, Leake Co, MS 4th Mississippi Cavalry
1916 Confederate Pension Application Leake County, 4th Mississippi Cavalry
1924 Confederate Pension Application by widow, Leake Co, MS

Company G, 4th Mississippi Cavalry, CSA, Capt. A. C. McKissick

64 iii. Martha Ann McMillan, born August 05, 1836 in Neshoba Co, MS died July 31, 1898 in Neshoba Co, MS. She married William Cornelius Dowd born June 08, 1828 in North Carolina died June 14, 1879 in Neshoba Co, MS.

1860 Neshoba Co, MS Census, Laurel Hill PO Township 10 Range 10 #857-885
1870 Neshoba Co, MS Census, Beat 4, #945-945
1880 - Living in the Neshoba Co, MS household of her brother Daniel W. McMillan.

65 iv. Daniel Wesley McMillan, born May 29, 1839 in Mississippi died July 16, 1916 in Dixon, Neshoba Co, MS. He married Nancy Lula Virginia Peebles September 30, 1869 in Dowdville, Neshoba Co, MS born May 26, 1854 in Mississippi died September 07, 1941 in Dixon, Neshoba Co, MS.

1870 - Living in the Neshoba Co, MS household of his brother James A. McMillan.
1880 Neshoba Co, MS Census, Beat 4, p. 9, Supv Dist 2, ED 69 #84-84
1910 Neshoba Co, MS Census, Beat 4, #235-236

5th Mississippi Infantry CSA, Company K, Scotland Guards

66 v. Francis M. McMillan, born March 14, 1842 in Neshoba Co, MS died April 28, 1860 in Neshoba Co, MS.

17. Hugh 3 McDonald (Daniel 2 , John 1 ) was born February 13, 1813 in Chesterfield Co, SC, and died June 12, 1894 in Laurel Hill, Neshoba County, MS. He married (1) Eliza Jane McNair February 25, 1839 in Robeson Co, NC, daughter of Malcom McNair and Jennet Little. She was born 1810 - 1814 in Maxton, Robeson Co, NC, and died July 15, 1869 in Laurel Hill, Neshoba County, MS. He married (2) Ann Estelle. She was born about 1838 in Alabama. Hugh & Eliza Jane McNair McDonald are buried at Old Carolina Cemetery, Neshoba Co, MS.

1850 Neshoba Co, MS Census #439-459
1860 Neshoba Co, MS Census, Laurel HIll PO Township 10 Range 10 #870-899
1870 Neshoba Co, MS Census, Beat 4, # 915-915
1880 Neshoba Co, MS Census, Beat 4, Supv Dist 2, ED 59 #36-36

Children of Hugh McDonald and Eliza Jane McNair are:

67 i. Catherine L. 4 McDonald, born November 19, 1839 in Neshoba Co, MS died February 07, 1902 in Neshoba or Leake Co, MS. She married John M. McMillan 1856 in Mississippi born May 26, 1832 in Tuscaloosa Co, AL died August 30, 1913 in Neshoba or Leake Co, MS. Both are buried in Old Carolina Cemetery, Neshoba Co, MS.

68 ii. Frances Annabella McDonald, born March 12, 1842 in Neshoba Co, MS died March 03, 1888 in Neshoba Co, MS. She married Micajah Pope Sanders born November 14, 1844 in Georgia died January 22, 1924.

1870 Neshoba Co, MS Census, Beat 4, #974-974

69 iii. Hugh W. McDonald, born December 15, 1844 died May 08, 1897 in Neshoba Co, MS. He married Anna Elizabeth Fincher born January 20, 1846 died November 13, 1898 in Neshoba Co, MS. Both are buried in Old Carolina Cemetery, Neshoba Co, MS.

70 iv. Malcolm D McDonald, born September 29, 1846 in Neshoba Co, MS died January 26, 1858 in Neshoba Co, MS.

71 v. John D McDonald, born March 02, 1849 in Mississippi died November 22, 1876 in Neshoba County, Ms/Carolina Cemetary. He married Mary Ella Hays Bef. 1870 born June 30, 1852 in Alabama died September 16, 1907.

1870 Neshoba Co, MS Census, Beat 4 #916-816

72 vi. James M McDonald, born September 24, 1851 in Neshoba Co, MS died March 15, 1883 in Neshoba Co, MS. He married Caroline McNair Bef. 1870 born June 08, 1853 in Georgia died April 01, 1883 in Neshoba Co, MS.

Was living in the 1870 Neshoba Co, MS household of his brother John D. McDonald.

73 vii. Marsellus A. McDonald, born Abt. 1855 in Mississippi.

18. Catherine 3 McDonald (Daniel 2 , John 1 ) was born March 18, 1816 in Chesterfield Co, SC, and died January 04, 1886 in Neshoba Co, MS. She married James Lewis December 22, 1832 in Perry Co, AL. He was born December 10, 1781 in South Carolina, and died 1842 in Tuscaloosa Co, AL. She is buried in Old Carolina Cemetery, Neshoba Co, MS.

1850 Neshoba Co, MS Census #436-456
1870 - Living in the Neshoba Co, MS household of her son Thomas Lewis.

Tuscaloosa Co, AL Deed Book Z. p. 76. To Hon. Samuel McNeil, Judge of Probate Court of Neshoba County, MS, Petition of James McDonald of said county shows that James Lewis, late of Tuscaloosa Co, AL left a daughter Lavinia, a minor of about 11 years, who is now living in said county of Neshoba with her mother, Catharine Lewis, widow of said decedent, and the sister of your petitioner, that said Catharine is unwilling to become guardian of her said daughter and has requester your petitioner to do so, that said James Lewis left to said daughter Lavinia by last will and testament a legacy of $1500 now in hands of County guardian for Tuscaloosa Co. 27 Dec. 1853.

Tuscaloosa Co, AL Orphans Court Records 1854-1858
April 27, 1857, p. 488. James Lewis deceased with will annexed. James C. Spencer, admr to pay to Catherine Lewis, the widow $548.90, to children of decd 12 in number each $182.96. Children: Charles A., James Jr, Andrew J., George W., Wiley, Thomas, Mary Wetherford, Manerva Lyon, Sarah Williams, Martha (Mrs. Edmond) Parker, Margaret McCarty, Louisa Lewis. Administrator has paid Wesley, Thomas & Lousa Lewis each the sum of $182.96 as per receipts of Hugh McDonald, their guardian.

Children of Catherine McDonald and James Lewis are:

74 i. William 4 Lewis, born Abt. 1835 in Alabama.

75 ii. Margaret Lewis, born Abt. 1836 in Alabama. She married Unknown McCarty.

76 iii. Thomas Lewis, born November 02, 1837 in Tuscaloosa Co, AL died May 10, 1909 in Dixon, Neshoba Co, MS. He married Martha E. Davis October 21, 1856 born April 08, 1837 in Tuscaloosa Co, AL died March 16, 1900 in Dixon, Neshoba Co, MS. Both are buried in Old Carolina Cemetery, Neshoba Co, MS.

1870 Neshoba Co, MS Census, Beat 4, #949-949

3rd Lieutanant, Williams Co, MS Cavalry, CSA

77 iv. Lavenia Lewis, born Abt. 1841 in Alabama.

78 v. Charles A. Lewis.

79 vi. James Lewis.

80 vii. Andrew J. Lewis.

81 viii. George W. Lewis.

82 ix. Mary Lewis. She married Unknown Wetherford.

83 x. Manerva Lewis. She married Unknown Lyon.

84 xi. Sarah Lewis. She married Unknown Williams.

85 xii. Martha Lewis. She married Edmond Parker.

19. James 3 McDonald (Daniel 2 , John 1 ) was born Bet. 1819 - 1820 in Chesterfield Co, SC, and died Abt. 1900 in Leake County, MS. He married Mary Ann McBride June 22, 1848 in Kemper Co, MS, daughter of Malcolm McBride and Mary. She was born Bet. 1827 - 1828 in South Carolina.

1850 Neshoba Co, MS Census #390-409
1880 Leake Co, MS Census, Beat 5, p. 455a, #433-439, Farmer

Children of James McDonald and Mary McBride are:

86 i. James F 4 McDonald.

87 ii. Mary McDonald. She married James W Nicholson.

88 iii. Talitha A McDonald. She married ? Hooper.

89 iv. Elizabeth McDonald, born Abt. 1849 in Mississippi. She married Unknown McCoy.

90 v. Robert McDonald, born Abt. 1852 in Mississippi.

91 vi. Martha McDonald, born Abt. 1863.

92 vii. Valer McDonald, born Abt. 1868.

93 viii. Dan A. McDonald, born Abt. 1871.

20. Catherine 3 McDonald (Murdock 2 , John 1 ) was born June 14, 1815 in South Carolina. She married John Campbell McBeath April 18, 1855, son of Walter McBeath and Elizabeth Campbell. He was born February 29, 1796 in Moore Co, NC, and died February 09, 1863 in Leake Co, MS.

1860 Leake Co, MS Census, Carthage PO, #959-959

Child of Catherine McDonald and John Campbell McBeath is:

94 i. Catherine 4 McBeath, born May 05, 1856 in Neshoba Co, MS.

23. Rev. Murdock James 3 McDonald (Murdock 2 , John 1 ) was born December 1822 in Chesterfield District, SC, and died 1906 in Neshoba Co, MS. He married Rebecca Henderson 1843 in South Carolina. She was born February 09, 1824 in South Carolina, and died May 21, 1900 in Neshoba Co, MS. Both are buied in Mt. Zion UMC Cemetery, Neshoba Co, MS.

1860 Neshoba Co, MS Census #440, T9 R11
1870 Neshoba Co, MS Census, Beat 4, #1035-1035
1900 Neshoba Co, MS Census, Beat 4, Supv District 5, ED 44, living in household of child Daniel.

Children of Murdock McDonald and Rebecca Henderson are:

95 i. Effie Ann 4 McDonald, born June 20, 1846 in South Carolina died January 19, 1915 in Neshoba Co, MS. She married John Polk Tyner Abt. 1864 born September 24, 1844 in Mississippi died November 15, 1923 in Probably Leake Co, MS. Both are buried in Mt. Zion UMC Cemetery, Neshoba Co, MS.

1870 Neshoba Co, MS Census #1199-1199, Beat 4, p. 369
1880 Neshoba Co, MS Census, Beat 4, p. 10, Supv District 2, ED 60 #82-82
1900 Neshoba Co, MS Census, Beat 4, Supv District 5, ED 44, #100-100
1910 Neshoba Co, MS Census, Beat 4, #88-88, p. 177, Supv Dist 5, ED 81, Sheet 8a, Farmer
1920 Leake Co, MS Census - Enumerated in household of his son Walter L. Tyner

96 ii. Margaret C. McDonald, born Abt. 1849 in South Carolina.

97 iii. Thomas W. McDonald, born May 1852 in South Carolina. He married Amanda C. Lovett 1871 in Mississippi born February 1852 in Mississippi.

1880 Neshoba Co, MS Census, Beat 4, Supv District 2, p. 14, ED 60, #110-110
1900 Neshoba Co, MS Census, Beat 4, Supv District 5, ED 44, #89-89

98 iv. Murdock T. McDonald, born February 16, 1854 in South Carolina died November 25, 1927. He married Francis Hoy 1875 in Mississippi born November 30, 1853 in Georgia died September 25, 1911.

1880 Neshoba Co, MS Census, Beat 4, p. 14, Supv District 2, ED 60 #113-113
1900 Neshoba Co, MS Census, Beat 4, Supv. District 5, ED 44, #92-92
1910 Neshoba Co, MS Census, Beat 4, #247-257

99 v. John H. McDonald, born Abt. 1856 in Mississippi. He married Catherine A. born Abt. 1855 in Mississippi.

1880 Neshoba Co, MS Census, Beat 4, p. 14, Supv District 2, ED 60, #115-115

100 vi. Daniel Joseph McDonald, born July 27, 1858 in Mississippi died July 17, 1909. He married (1) Mary Augusta Hoye born February 15, 1861 died May 07, 1880 in Mississippi. He married (2) Ella 1880 in Mississippi born June 1859 in Mississippi.

1900 Neshoba Co, MS Census, Beat 4, Supv District 5, ED 55

101 vii. Peter J. P. McDonald, born June 13, 1862 died July 17, 1909.

102 viii. Francis R. McDonald, born Abt. 1869.

26. James Monroe 3 McNair (Christina 2 McDonald, John 1 ) was born 1826 in South Carolina, and died February 04, 1913. He married Lovidey Jane McDonald, daughter of James McDonald and Flora Campbell. She was born September 01, 1836 in South Carolina, and died October 07, 1875.

1870 Neshoba Co, MS Census

Children of James Monroe McNair and Lovidey Jane McDonald are:

103 i. James A. 4 McNair, born Abt. 1860.

104 ii. Jefferson D. McNair, born Abt. 1861.

105 iii. Amma V. McNair, born Abt. 1863.

106 iv. Lovidey A. McNair, born Abt. 1866.

107 v. Eulalia V. McNair, born Abt. 1868.

31. Lovidey Jane 3 McDonald (James 2 , John 1 ) was born September 01, 1836 in South Carolina, and died October 07, 1875. She married James Monroe McNair, son of Alexander McNair and Christina McDonald. He was born 1826 in South Carolina, and died February 04, 1913.


MCDONALD Genealogy

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Perry County, Mississippi Genealogy and History

In December, 1809 Wayne County, Mississippi Territory was formed from Choctaw Indian lands obtained through The Treaty of Mount Dexter in 1805. On December 9, 1811 Greene County was created out of Wayne county. Perry County was established February 3, 1820, and originally formed the western part of the large county of Greene primarily because the settlers didn't want to cross the river to get to the Courthouse!

History tells us that as more and more people arrived, they began to settle along the creeks and rivers in western Greene county. The pioneers once again began to complain about having to cross the river to conduct business at the courthouse. Thus, the movement began to create a separate county with a courthouse above the Leaf River instead of below. (Greene County's Courthouse was built on Leaf river at Boise (French for wood) Bluff which was the highest point on the river in Greene County and relatively safe from Indian attacks. Boise Bluff is located between Atkinson and Courthouse Creeks about 3/4 miler upriver from present day Highway 98 Bridge at McLain.)

This movement was led by the Gains family who owned 1,300 acres on both sides of the creek bearing their name (Gaines Creek). George S. Gains was the government's Indian factor (agent) at St. Stephens and knew most of the territorial officials personally. Gaines used his influence with those officials to get the federal land office moved from the Jackson County Courthouse to Augusta, the largest settlement in western Greene county. The people no longer had to travel to St. Stephens on the Tombigbee river to record their land deeds.

By 1819 the Augusta land office was in operation and a new county was ready to be formed, on February 3, 1820, Perry County was born and named for War of 1812 Naval Hero, Commodore Oliver Hazard Perry who died in 1819. Once Perry County was formed, the Greene County Courthouse on the western edge of Greene County and this led to its relocation to Leakesville, which was closer to the center of the county, around 1826.

Its civil officers during the first year of its existence were: Jacob H. MORRIS, Chief Justice of the Quorum and John JENKINS, John GREEN, Jacob CARTER, Craven P. MOFFITT, Associate Justices Alex. McKENZIE, Eli MOFFITT, Benjamin H.G. HARFIELD, William HUDSON, John MOFFIT, Seth GRANBERRY, Lewis W. John McDONALD, Assessor and Collector Geo. HARRISON, Ranger Joel LEWIS, Surveyor John BARLOW, Constable Wm. TISDALE, Coroner, J.J.H. MORRIS, Notary PUBLIC, Martin CHADWICK, Sheriff. Some of the other county officers, 1821-1827, were Griffin HOLLOMON, J.J.H. MORRIS, John F. MAPP, Abner CARTER, Judges of Probate Lewis RHODES, Sheriff Anthony PITTS, Adam ULMER, Jonathan TAYLOR, Geo. B. DAMERON, Sterling BRINSON, John DEACE, Daniel MILEY, James SIMMONS, Sherod BYRD, Isham H. CLAYTON, James OVERSTREET, Uriah MILLSAPP, Justices of the Peace Hugh McDONALD, Treasurer Farr PROCTOR, Go. HARRISON, Lewis RHODES, Assessors and Collectors. (See all Early Settlers of Perry County).

Perry County was settled by a large number of hardy pioneers along its many waterways, and is located in the southeastern part of the State, in the long-leaf pine belt, and is bounded on the north by Jones and Wayne counties, on the east by Greene County, on the south by Harrison county and on the west by Lamar and Pearl River Counties, and has an area of twenty-six townships, or 936 square miles. The Leaf River was a main mode of transportation during the early years, being utilized by the many loggers of the County to transport the logs to the Mississippi Gulf Coast area. Many of the early settlers were Farmers, both food and livestock. The principal streams are the Leaf River, which flows through the center of the county from the northwest to the southeast with its numerous tributaries and Black Creek and its tributaries in the southern part. The prevailing timber is the long leaf pine, but on the rivers and creeks, oaks, hickory, poplar, magnolia, gums, cypress, etc., are found.

Its population has always been small in proportion to its acres. Within recent years its valuable timber resources have been partially exploited and it has taken on a new and permanent growth from a total of 6,456 inhabitants in 1890, increased to 14,682 in 1900, a rate of increase considerably in excess of one hundred per cent.

The county seat, until 1906 was the old town of Augusta, near the center of the county on the east bank of the Leaf River. Old August remains a small village today.


Hugh McDonald - History

Hugh McDonald was born on July 17, 1954, and died on November 18, 2016.

He was an Australian musician.

He was running from the 1970s to 2016, Hugh performed and recorded with The Bushwackers, The Sundowners, Banshee, Redgum, Des ‘Animal’ McKenna, Moving Cloud, and The Colonials.

McDonald became better known when he joined the folk-rock group Redgum in 1981.

He wrote a number of the group’s songs, including “The Diamantina Drover”.

Following his position as lead singer John Schumann left the band in 1986, he took over as lead singer until the group disbanded in 1990.

Post-Redgum, Hugh McDonald continued playing and recording music, and also taught music, including working with the Geelong Music College Orchestra.

Also to that, he has his own recording studios in Melbourne.

He also lent his musical and recording expertise to the production of the Poowong Consolidated Primary School’s annual music CD and more recently DVD.

Hugh McDonald has worked alongside the students and music teacher Phil Beggs to compose, write, record and produce the CD.

Since 2005 he worked with Schumann again as part of the Vagabond Crew, touring and performing on the albums Lawson and Behind the Lines.

However, The latter album was recorded at McDonald’s studios.

During 2014 he released his fourth post-Redgum solo album titled The Land, which includes his more recent originals “If It All Goes South”, a tender heartfelt song which he wrote for his wife, Rebecca Harris Mason, and “Shrodinger’s Cat”, a contemplative song about accepting the uncertainties of life.

He performed for Australian forces overseas several times.

During December 2009 he visited East Timor to play for Australian and New Zealand troops stationed there, in September–October 2011 Hugh McDonald played for Australian troops in Afghanistan and in July 2013 he played for Australian troops and Australian Federal Police in the Solomon Islands.

During 2014 Hugh McDonald played for the Royal Australian Navy troops in Tanzania, Africa, and in March 2016 he returned to Afghanistan to play for the Australian troops.

Since 2015, McDonald had seven children, six grandchildren and lived with his wife, pianist Rebecca Harris Mason, and his two stepchildren.

Hugh McDonald’s daughter, Georgia, is also a musician who sings and plays guitar in Melbourne band Camp Cope.


6 thoughts on &ldquo McDonald, Hugh Rennie &rdquo

I visited Hugh’s grave in April 2014. His great niece is to marry my son. He was a brave boy who almost lasted out the war despite serious illness and two incidents of being wounded.

hi Veronica he was my uncle tryng to find out as much as i can about Hugh and the family tree
cheers Peter

Hi Peter
would you like me to pass your email to family members who attended our Anzac Service?
regards Jo

Hello Peter!
Wonderful to have contact with one of Hughs nephews . My son is marrying Narelle Mundy and I’m going to be little help to you but if you’d like to send your email address to me at [email protected] I can pass it to Narelle to contact you. We feel honoured that our family will be linked to yours and to Hugh. I had 3 uncles on the Somme – dads brothers – I’m a late child & dad was much younger than them. They all survived to come home. But I’m deeply interested in the whole war & will be going to 1/7/1916 commemorations next year on the Somme. You’ll be interested to know Narelle is beautiful on the inside as well as the outside and has Hughs distinctive jawline. Her dad and mum have just retired from a life with the Salvation Army. I’d love to see some pictures of you and other relatives of Hughs. Verinica

Peter I’d love to receive any info you find on Hugh. I’ve read his digital war record and the Unit dairy of the 48th Battalion and I can’t be sure but it might have been a sniper that killed Hugh as there was not actual fighting on that day where they were but the diary mentioned someone was shot. One of your other relatives may know . I use a travel co from the UK called Bartletts Battlefied Journeys – they are best in the business and do the research required to show you exactly where relatives were etc David Bartlett has done some walking of the field where Hugh died and was first buried (not far from where he’s been reburied at Villers Bretoneux .) I’ll be walking Hughs footsteps in 2017 when I go back for the 100 year commemorations at Bullecourt where one of my uncles fighting alongside of Albert Jacka in the 14th Battalion , was wounded & taken POW on 11/4/1917. Interestingly Hughs 48th fought the same battle but Hugh was out of action due to previous wounds or illness, I can’t quite remember which. Otherwise they would’ve fought together and now their descendants Narelle and my Matt will be married ! Yes so in 2017 I will make Hughs experiences in the war physical and personal. Did you also know that the Aust War Memorial in Canberra has a display throughout this year and next where each soldiers name killed will be projected onto the Memorials facade? Each soldier features around 8 times & Hugh will come up again on the 29th of this month. A very sad and poignant thing. You can go onto the site & see the other dates for Hugh. I hope to get up there for one of the nights next year.


The Frost McDonald Family History

You can think of this blog as a reliquary. It contains all the sacred relics of my father's and mother's families. Most of the relics will be presented in the form of photos or reminiscences or both.

Happy Times


Let's start here, in a restaurant on Long Island, New York in August 1978 .

That's me in the front, between Dad and Mom. My sister Audrey is standing behind me, with her hand on my shoulder. Brother Bert is to the left of Audrey, and brother Harry is to the right. Right of Harry is brother Hugh.

Earlier Times

All seven members of our Happy Times family came to America from Northern Ireland in March 1950 aboard the Cunard liner Franconia .
It took seven days and was said to be the worst March crossing of the north Atlantic in many years. I was four.

When I was twelve, Mom and Dad took me back to "the old country" in July 1958 . We flew (for the very first time) for twelve hours on a Pan Am DC-7C from New York City to Shannon, Ireland with a re-fueling stop in Gander, Newfoundland, Canada.
Mom hated the airplane flight so much, she made Dad change our return trip to the Cunard liner Mauretania .
It was said to be the worst July crossing of the north Atlantic in many years.

A Short Chronology of People

  1. Dad (1904-1982)
  2. Mom (1905-1998)
  3. Audrey (1929- )
  4. Harry (1934-2005)
  5. Bert (1936-1995)
  6. Hugh (1940-1991)
  7. Me (1946- )

A Short Chronology of Places

  • 14 Torrens Parade , Belfast, Northern Ireland, UK (1943-1950)
  • 115-02 Rockaway Beach Blvd. , Rockaway Park, NY, USA (1951-1956)
  • 172 Beach 114th Street , Rockaway Park, NY, USA (1956-1957)
  • 69-18 Beach Channel Drive , Arverne, NY, USA (1957-1963)
  • 227 Beach 99th Street , Rockaway Beach, NY, USA (1963-1970)

Alan Looks Back (and forward) at Britishness

My aunt Vickie was such a one. She missed the boat to America (actually, she wasn’t invited) when we left Belfast in 1950, but she often came to visit us during her summer vacations.
(On the left is a 1963 picture of Aunt Vickie on a Bench.)

Vickie was named for the reigning queen when she was born, and she bore herself with regal elegance. She was amazingly erect and well spoken, and she was very proud of her English heritage (on her father’s side). Every Christmas, Vickie sent us a calendar with pictures of the Royal Family, and every summer she showed up at our home on Rockaway Beach.

My otherwise positive view of my aunt was colored by my mother’s utter disdain for the woman. Mom was annoyed that Vickie free loaded off us all summer, never offered to help around the house and drank gin on the sly. Mom also noted that Vickie was a waitress and not a member of royalty, even though she lorded it over everyone she met.

So, here’s my point: America is a classless society that is fascinated by visiting “royalty,” but in the end we reject unearned privilege. Britain has produced great poets, playwrights, warriors and statesmen who have earned the world’s praise. She has also produced some “first class” prats (like my aunt) who can keep their snooty attitudes at home (or just take them to the Costa del Sol like she had to after my mother rescinded her annual invitation).

A Short History of Me

I was born in Belfast, Northern Ireland, on January 19, 1946 (right between Van Morrison and George Best, though I fancy myself more like that younger fella, Stephen Rea). I have no memory of my life in Belfast, my trip to America or any place we lived in New York before we settled on 115th Street in Rockaway when I was five. I attended PS 43, JHS 198 and Far Rockaway High School, where I graduated in 1963. I went to Brooklyn College for two years, got married to Virginia Orozco, moved to Detroit and finished college and law school at Wayne State University. Virginia and I had two children, Mary Elizabeth (December 11, 1965) and David Anthony (June 21, 1969). We moved to Milwaukee for two years, then settled in Rochester, New York in 1973. I was divorced in 1982 and married Katherine (Kay) Grady in 1985. Kay has two daughters from a prior marriage, Rachel Katherine (May 21, 1978) and Bridget Audrey (March 12, 1981). Our son Robert Forrest was born on January 14, 1986.

Kay and I live in Webster, a Rochester suburb on Lake Ontario, with a passel of wiener dogs. Here's me with one of them (Butter). This picture was taken on July 29, 2007 in front of our friend Claire Kaler's cottage at Sodus Point, New York.


MACDONALD Genealogy

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Redgum

Redgum are an important band in the history of Australian music, responsible for political folk-rock that had an actual influence on the politics of the time. They are best remembered for their protest…
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Artist Biography by Jody Macgregor

Redgum are an important band in the history of Australian music, responsible for political folk-rock that had an actual influence on the politics of the time. They are best remembered for their protest song "I Was Only Nineteen (A Walk in the Light Green)," which underwent something of a popular revival during Australia's participation in the second Iraq war. The band formed at Adelaide's Flinders University in 1975 while the members were attending the same politics and art class. The three students, John Schumann (vocals, guitar), Michael Atkinson (guitar, piano, vocals, mandolin), and Verity Truman (flute, saxophone, tin whistle, vocals) volunteered to submit a musical piece for their group assignment. The political songs they performed were so popular with their classmates that they found themselves immediately fielding calls to play at parties, political rallies, and pubs -- though they hadn't even decided on a name yet. Fellow Flinders University student Chris Timms joined them on violin and the then four-piece settled on the name Redgum.

Their first album, If You Don't Fight You Lose, debuted in 1978. It was recorded after a radio station told the band that approximately 200 people were requesting they make copies of the early demo recording they had been broadcasting. Each bandmember continued to work and study while performing on weekends and holidays until after the release of their popular second album, Virgin Ground, in 1981 convinced them to make the band a full-time priority. Tom Stehlik (drums) and Dave Flett (bass) joined the band, while Chris Timms left to be replaced by Hugh McDonald (violin, bass, guitar, vocals). It was their live album Caught in the Act, released in 1983, that made Redgum a national and enduring sensation. Its single, "I Was Only Nineteen (A Walk in the Light Green," went to number one. The song's frank depiction of the experiences of a Vietnam veteran, based on the story of Schumann's brother-in-law, made many Australians rethink their positions and within a year there was a Royal Commission into the use of Agent Orange and other chemicals by the Australian military. Royalties from the song were donated to the Vietnam Veterans of Australia Association.

By 1984 Flett and Stehlik had left the band. Brian Czempinski took over for Stehlik on drums, and Michael Spicer (piano) and Stephen Cooney (didgeridoo, bass, mandolin, banjo) were added to the lineup for their next album, Frontline. In 1986, at the height of their fame, lead singer Schumann left to sign with CBS as a solo act and thereafter enter politics. The group carried on in his absence, releasing the Midnight Sun album later that year. Atkinson left in 1987 and the group disbanded permanently in 1990 without recording anything further. In 2005 Redgum's music became unexpectedly popular and relevant to a new generation when political hip-hop act the Herd began performing their own interpretation of "I Was Only 19" at their concerts, eventually recording an acoustic version featuring Schumann as a guest for the re-release of their album The Sun Never Sets.


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