The mystery of the "lost girl" of the Titanic is clarified

The mystery of the

The story of the sinking of the famous British ocean liner that hit an iceberg in April 1912 carries with it a whole string of myths and fantasies from which numerous speculations and, also, fraud have derived. Such is the case of Loraine Allison, a passenger who traveled with her mother in the RMS Titanic when I was only two years old. They were the only two upper-class traveler bodies that were not found.

30 years later from the shipwreck, a woman called Helen Kramer claimed to be the lost girl and demanded recognition from the family. He provided numerous personal family information and revealed all kinds of shocking data, such as that his real father was Thomas Andrew, designer of the ship that died in the sinking.

Nonetheless, Kramer died without being able to prove what he claimed, without official recognition and, therefore, without the supposed millionaire legacy that he could have inherited otherwise. But with the centennial celebration of the event in 2012, Helen's great-granddaughter, Debrina Woods, resumed the lawsuit and undertook a pompous campaign to be recognized as the heir to the Allison family, assuring that at no time was her intention to gain the millionaire inheritance.

A whole string of followers and fans of the shipwreck story created campaigns to unravel the mystery. Now, DNA analysis techniques have made it possible to find out if what Helen Kramer and her great-granddaughter claimed is true. Comparison of Kramer's DNA with those of the Allison family has been negative, so it seems that everything had been a media fraud of the many that surround the Titanic and its sinking.

With everything, Woods continues to be determined to prove the veracity of her story and assures that there is no family fortune"Most of the money was gone in the 1929 crash and the rest was mismanaged by the two remaining brothers George and WP (William Percival) Allison," he says. The mystery of Lorrain Allison remains open.

Romantic, in the artistic sense of the word. In my adolescence both family and friends reminded me over and over that I was an inveterate humanist, as I spent time doing what perhaps others not so much, believing myself to be Bécquer, immersed in my own artistic fantasies, in books and movies, constantly wanting to travel and explore the world, admired for my historical past and for the wonderful productions of the human being. That is why I decided to study History and combine it with Art History, because it seemed to me the most appropriate way to carry out the skills and passions that characterize me: reading, writing, traveling, researching, knowing, making known, educating. Disclosure is another of my motivations, because I understand that there is no word that has real value if it is not because it has been transmitted effectively. And with this, I am determined that everything I do in my life has an educational purpose.


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